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Sep 14, 2023Liked by Massimo Pigliucci

I especially loved the comparison with enjoying really great food rather than large portions, and savoring great moments in life rather than focusing on it's length

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For me it's not death I'm afraid of, but that the option of walking through the open door may not be available due to circumstances outside of my control e.g. loss of mental or physical capacity. Fate permitting, I will be able to accomplish what is up to me at the time of my choosing.

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Vivian, that's why I'm part of an effort to lobby the New York legislature to pass an "aid in dying" bill, like the ones in effect in Oregon, New Jersey, and other states. Not to mention Switzerland, the Netherlands, and so forth.

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Yes, I'm also part of a lobby group here which has been successful in passing a Voluntary Assisted Dying (VAD) bill in all Australian states. I'm a lifelong member of Exit International, & our aim is to remove the need to have medical assessment & permission. Currently To access VAD, each State requires a person to undergo a request and assessment process. It generally involves a person:

1. making at least three requests for VAD;

2. andbeing assessed as eligible by at least two independent medical practitioners.

It's a step in the right direction, but not enough, as in Switzerland, Holland etc.

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Similar situation for the bill we are fighting for in New York. A first step, but not enough.

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founding

Wow! 😮👍👍👍

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The Chorus in Oedipus echoes the same solution. The argument, “Better to have not been born at all,” is like practicing abstinence for contraception. Illogical. In the U.S. school system it is required teaching as one of the options for contraception. I agree with the Epicureans on the pointless fear of eventually dying--the knowledge one dies--as we carry it in our minds throughout life, too. Moreover, only in the most severe and dire of circumstances, particular to an individual’s suffering situation, can one not find an appreciation for life. There’s time enough for dying.

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Indeed, there is time enough for dying. No need to rush.

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Well, I agree with his take re fearing death,i.e., don't....I've never had that issue (tho I have plenty of other ones :) ) On the other hand, I'll pass on the deity advice; have thought for many years that all religions, as practiced, cause more harm than good- and that God is along the lines of the Tooth Fairy n Santa Clause..."believe" if you wish; I'll pass.

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Well, I'm an atheist, and not an Epicurean. But Epicurus would agree with you about organized religion. Indeed, one of his main points was that the gods don't give a crap about us, and that there is no afterlife. So don't listen to the priests who wish to scare and control you with their made up tales...

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Trust me-a VERY collapsed Catholic, here; grew up/raised in the Church..altar/choir boy, uncle was chaplain at West Point, etc…. the whole deal-but left a long time ago…and I would never listen to a priest again, about anything, ever again, given the Church’s disgraceful conduct.

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Not sure why, but unlike Andrew Ralston, this all seemed empty to me. Bad mood mayhap.

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Different strokes for different folks!

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Sep 11, 2023Liked by Massimo Pigliucci

I find Epicurus more interesting the more I learn of him. Thanks!

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